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Nettie SP-1436 - History

Nettie SP-1436 - History

Nettie
(SP-1436: t. 5; 1. 41'; b. 9'; dr. 2'6"; s. 8 k.)

Nettie, a motorboat built in 1912, was acquired by the Navy from the Conservation Commission of Maryland 17 August 1917 and commissioned shortly thereafter, Chief Master at Arms Andrew Johnson in command.

Operating in the 5th Naval District, headquartered at Norfolk, during World War I, Nettie patrolled the Patuxent River and adjoining Bay area, basing operations at Solomon's Island, Md., where she became frozen in the ice for a time in the extreme cold of February 1918.

Nettie decommissioned and was returned to her owner 26 November 1918.


یواس‌اس نتی (اس‌پی-۱۴۳۶)

یواس‌اس نتی (اس‌پی-۱۴۳۶) (به انگلیسی: USS Nettie (SP-1436) ) یک کشتی بود که طول آن ۴۱ فوت (۱۲ متر) بود. این کشتی در سال ۱۹۱۲ ساخته شد.

یواس‌اس نتی (اس‌پی-۱۴۳۶)
پیشینه
مالک
تکمیل ساخت: ۱۹۱۲
به دست آورده شده: ۱۷ اوت ۱۹۱۷
اعزام: ۱۹۱۷
مشخصات اصلی
گنجایش: 5 tons
درازا: ۴۱ فوت (۱۲ متر)
پهنا: ۹ فوت (۲٫۷ متر)
آبخور: ۲ فوت ۶ اینچ (۰٫۷۶ متر)
سرعت: 8 knots

این یک مقالهٔ خرد کشتی یا قایق است. می‌توانید با گسترش آن به ویکی‌پدیا کمک کنید.


What Nettie family records will you find?

There are 3,000 census records available for the last name Nettie. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Nettie census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 234 immigration records available for the last name Nettie. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 154 military records available for the last name Nettie. For the veterans among your Nettie ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 3,000 census records available for the last name Nettie. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Nettie census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 234 immigration records available for the last name Nettie. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 154 military records available for the last name Nettie. For the veterans among your Nettie ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


Nettie Stevens

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Nettie Stevens, in full Nettie Maria Stevens, (born July 7, 1861, Cavendish, Vermont, U.S.—died May 4, 1912, Baltimore, Maryland), American biologist and geneticist who was one of the first scientists to find that sex is determined by a particular configuration of chromosomes.

Stevens’s early life is somewhat obscure, although it is known that she taught school and attended the State Normal School (now Westfield State College) in Westfield, Massachusetts, in 1881–83. In 1896 she entered Stanford University, earning a B.A. in 1899 and an M.A. in 1900. She began doctoral studies in biology at Bryn Mawr College, which included a year of study (1901–02) at the Zoological Station in Naples, Italy, and at the Zoological Institute of the University of Würzburg, Germany. She received a Ph.D. from Bryn Mawr in 1903 and remained at the college as a research fellow in biology for a year, as reader in experimental morphology for another year, and as associate in experimental morphology from 1905 until her death.

Stevens’s earliest field of research was the morphology and taxonomy of the ciliate protozoa her first published paper, in 1901, had dealt with such a protozoan. She soon turned to cytology and the regenerative process. One of her major papers in that field was written in 1904 with zoologist and geneticist Thomas Hunt Morgan, who in 1933 would win the Nobel Prize for his work. Her investigations into regeneration led her to a study of differentiation in embryos and then to a study of chromosomes. In 1905, after experiments with the yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor), she published a paper in which she announced her finding that a particular combination of the chromosomes known as X and Y was responsible for the determination of the sex of an individual.

This discovery, also announced independently that year by Edmund Beecher Wilson of Columbia University, not only ended the long-standing debate over whether sex was a matter of heredity or embryonic environmental influence but also was the first firm link between a heritable characteristic and a particular chromosome. Stevens continued her research on the chromosome makeup of various insects, discovering supernumerary chromosomes in certain insects and the paired state of chromosomes in flies and mosquitoes.


Census records can tell you a lot of little known facts about your 'nettie' ancestors, such as occupation. Occupation can tell you about your ancestor's social and economic status.

There are 3,000 census records available for the last name 'nettie'. Like a window into their day-to-day life, 'nettie' census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 642 immigration records available for the last name 'nettie'. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name 'nettie'. For the veterans among your 'nettie' ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 3,000 census records available for the last name 'nettie'. Like a window into their day-to-day life, 'nettie' census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 642 immigration records available for the last name 'nettie'. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name 'nettie'. For the veterans among your 'nettie' ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


Nettie Grimes Gregory

Nettie Gregory (1890-1964) was a prominent black woman in Utah. The Nettie Gregory Center, a community center for the black community of Salt Lake City, was named for her. Digital Image (c) 2004 Utah State Historical Society.

She cared about people of every race and creed.

Born August 5, 1890, in Jackson, Tennessee, to Fosh Elliott and Ann Elizabeth Copeland Grimes, Nettie was a teacher and an accomplished musician who had never ventured outside her native state until her marriage in 1914 to William Gregory. Also a native Tennessean, he had taken up permanent residence in Salt Lake City in 1913 as a railroad employee and had wooed Nettie by mail. The couple had two sons and two daughters.

Nettie Gregory devoted her life to helping others.

Nettie Gregory quickly adapted to life in Utah and sought to make herself useful to the community. She was especially concerned about the lack of wholesome recreation for young people living on the city’s west side. She and her husband began some activities at the Calvary Baptist Church but found that the number of young people wanting to participate exceeded the capacity of the church’s facilities. The answer was obvious to the Gregorys. Their neighborhood needed its own building with adequate space for a variety of community activities, including weddings, socials, and youth programs. William Gregory donated a small parcel of land, and according to Deseret News reporter Rose Mary Pederson, Nettie Gregory “recruited black women belonging to the Salt Lake Community Club and the Nimble Thimble Club to act as leaders in the fund-raising drive.” They held dinners, bake sales, and bazaars.

In 1959 construction of the first civic building in Salt Lake City built by African Americans began. The project required 5 years to complete, but the idea had been in Nettie’s heart for almost 20 years. At the building’s dedication in November 1964 Gov. George D. Clyde was among the dignitaries present. Los Angeles educator James Laster spoke on the need to improve neighborhoods everywhere and for a larger “community of parents” to support and guide children.

Although Nettie had died of a stroke on July 6, 1964, those preparing to use the building recognized her by naming the new structure at 742 West South Temple the Nettie Gregory Center. The needs of African American youth had spurred the drive to build it, but the Gregorys always envisioned it as a place where people of all races and creeds would be welcome. In the words of William Gregory: “My wife and I always felt that there should be complete equality there. . . we wanted the center to serve everyone.”


The Ghost of the Dock Street Theatre

With nearly 350 years of history under its belt, the City of Charleston lays host to countless ghosts. Some of the city’s most infamous lost souls can be found at the historic Dock Street Theatre.

Guests of the theatre have claimed to see spirits roaming about, sightings of ghostly shadows in the rafters, and apparitions on the stage. Many are left to wonder just who these ghosts were. Were they failed actors? Were they long time admirers of the theatre? Or, is it possible that something more tragic occurred at the building?

While there have been numerous sightings throughout the building’s long history, there are two particular spirits that have been seen more than any of the others.

The Ghost of Junius Booth

One of these two specters is believed to be Junius Brutus Booth the father of the infamous presidential assassin. No one is quite sure why his ghost is haunting the Dock Street Theatre (formerly Planter’s Hotel), as he was not even in Charleston at the time of his passing, he was miles away in Louisville, Kentucky.

And, aside from performing at the former hotel with his theatre troupe, and the rumor that he tried the to kill the manager of the Planter’s Hotel, he doesn’t really have any strong ties to the building. Nothing to warrant his haunting of the building.

But, logic and facts aside, it is possible that the ghost of Junius Booth is indeed haunting the theatre. However, it is more plausible that it is the ghost of another lost soul. Maybe another actor, unwilling to leave the spotlight of the stage.

The Ghost of Nettie

The most frequently spotted ghost at Dock Street Theatre is Nettie. Some claim that her full name was Nettie Dickerson. While others believe she was nameless, and thusly dubbed Nettie by the locals.

Nettie lived in Charleston during the 1800s, and could usually be found at the Planter’s Hotel. She was not a guest nor a member of the staff at the Planter’s Hotel per se. You see, Nettie was a bit of a freelancer, her occupation? Well, it was the world’s oldest profession, she was a prostitute.

The ghost of Nettie can be seen gliding around aimless throughout the Dock Street Theatre. Some of those who have caught a glimpse of Nettie, claim that she wore a tattered yet vibrantly colored, red dress.

But, how did Nettie come to haunt the Dock Street Theatre?

The Story of Nettie

During the Planter’s heyday, the hotel was a place where the wealthy men of Charleston would congregate. It was a place where they were free to drink copious amounts of alcohol, gamble away a small fortune, and engage in extramarital affairs with the local prostitutes.

One of these ladies of the night was the twenty five-year-old, Nettie. It’s believed that young Nettie was a country girl, who dreamed of the city life, and arrived in Charleston sometime in the early 1840s.

Nettie’s reasons for coming to Charleston was to find love and excitement. But unfortunately for Nettie she lived in era when 25 was considered well passed the marrying age. The wealthy men of Charleston were looking for brides who were still in their teens, they were not interested in marrying someone considered to be a spinster.

Aside from Nettie’s age, her social status was also a factor. Back in the day, it was very uncommon for people to marry beneath their class, this was especially so in Charleston. A stigma that actually continues in some social circles in the city today,

And, while many of the men of Charleston were taken with Nettie’s beauty, they were only interested in lust not love. Her dreams of a better life, dreams of happiness and love now crushed, Nettie began looking for work.

Nettie became a clerk at St. Phillip’s Episcopal Church. She took to the job well, and got along with the priest. But, nonetheless, she felt as she did not belong, it was impossible for her to compete, and knew she would never truly be accepted into Charleston’s high society.

The Fall of Nettie

Nettie grew tired of trying to get ahead in Charleston, and quit her job despite the priest’s efforts to sway her from doing so, begging her not to lose heart. But, it was too late, she had.

With the money she was able to save from her job at the church, she went to one of the most upscale stores in Charleston, and bought the most expensive dress they had. A gorgeous red dress, that would catch the eye of any man. And, With her new dress she entered the Planter’s Hotel with this very intent.

With her new mindset, looks and red dress, she adapted well to her new profession. Still bitter at the society that refused to welcome her, she would continue to go to church every Sunday. And, whenever one of the women (many of whom’s husbands were Nettie’s customers) would cast aspersions or give her an ugly look, she would audaciously confront said women and her husband.

As you can imagine, Nettie’s lack of discretion cost her many of her customers, and quickly became penniless. Distraught, she snapped, Nettie went out onto the second floor balcony of the Planter’s, while in her red dress, and stayed out there despite the brewing storm. She began shouting out disparaging remarks against Charleston’s high society, even as the storm intensified.

The priest who still cared for Nettie rushed out into the street, and tried to reason with her. It is said that she then hollered down to him, “You can’t save me!” And, as fate would have it, a bolt of lightning struck Nettie dead.

While the Planter’s Hotel is long gone, Nettie’s spirit can still be seen at the Dock Street Theatre, red dress and all.


The experiment that led to sex determination

Born in 1861 in Vermont, Nettie Stevens was passionate about science from an early age. She worked as a teacher after graduating high school but at the back of her mind she knew that was not what she was destined to do.

She saved money from her teaching profession and enrolled into Stanford University at the age of 35 to do what she always dreamt of doing which is to study science. She excelled as a science student and graduated top of her class with a B.A in 1899. She did her M.A a year later

She then joined Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania and it is here where she worked to solve the problem of sex determination. The theory that chromosomes bore hereditary information was relatively new in early 1900 and the science world was trying to determine how character traits like the biological sex of an individual were passed down across generations.

Stevens was working on the mealworm beetle as she sought to find out if sex was genetically inherited. When observing the female mealworm beetle, she found that her sex cells had 20 large chromosomes. The male also had 20 chromosomes but only 19 were large and the 20 th was small.

She wrote in a report that that distinct feature was a clear case of sexual determination.

She concluded that the difference in either male or female offspring was down to the sperm of the male beetle. If the sperm contained the smaller 20 th chromosome, then the offspring would be male and if the sperm contained the large chromosome, the offspring would be female. She didn’t name the chromosomes X and Y chromosomes. (This naming convention would be adopted at a later date.)


Helen Taft

Helen Taft (1861-1943) was an American first lady (1909-13) and the wife of William Howard Taft, 27th president of the United States and later chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. As a member of a successful Ohio political family, Helen (or Nellie, as she was called) fully supported her husband’s career ambitions, and was such a trusted aide and advisor to him that many credited her with his ultimate success. When President Taft was inaugurated in March 1909, Nellie Taft broke with tradition, becoming the first first lady to accompany her husband in the inaugural parade to the White House. Nellie Taft is the only woman to be both first lady and the wife of the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Helen Louise “Nellie” Herron was the fifth of 10 children born into a prosperous Cincinnati family. Her father, John Williamson Herron, had gone to college with future President Benjamin Harrison, and then formed a law partnership with another future head of state in Rutherford Hayes. It was during a trip to visit Hayes in the White House in 1877 that Nellie first determined she wanted to someday live there as first lady. Having developed an early love for the arts, she also dreamed of achieving success as a musician or a writer, and attended the Cincinnati College of Music.

Although the Herron and Taft families had been friends for years, Nellie didn’t know her future husband until meeting him at a sledding party as a teenager. They grew closer after he began attending the literary salon she founded in 1884 to engage in political and intellectual discussions. Fully realizing the obstacles facing a career-minded woman in that era, Nellie recognized in the Yale University and Cincinnati Law School graduate the potential for major accomplishments. They were married at the Herron home on June 19, 1886.

Nellie did everything she could to boost her husband’s chances of landing in the White House. When Taft was named solicitor general by President Harrison in 1890, she helped build his confidence and skills as a public speaker. Nellie also encouraged Taft in 1900 to head a commission tasked with establishing a civilian government in the Philippines, an experience that gave her a taste of life as the first lady of a territorial chief. And after Taft became Teddy Roosevelt’s secretary of war in 1904, Nellie leaned on the president to secure his support for her husband’s nomination in 1908.

Although Nellie was forced her to dial back her influence after suffering a stroke early in her husband’s administration, she nonetheless left a tangible legacy of her time as first lady. Recalling her days at the popular community festivals in the Philippines, she oversaw the construction of a bandstand and the formation of an outdoor concert series in West Potomac Park. Most famously, she was responsible for introducing the park’s famous cherry blossom trees. After the project was nearly derailed by the shipment of diseased trees from Japan, the first lady teamed with the Japanese ambassador’s wife to plant the first two specimens from a healthy crop in March 1912.


Decline and fall

Decline and fall

Toledo fell to Christianity in 1085 ©

The collapse of Islamic rule in Spain was due not only to increasing aggression on the part of Christian states, but to divisions among the Muslim rulers. The rot came from both the centre and the extremities.

Early in the eleventh century, the single Islamic Caliphate had shattered into a score of small kingdoms, ripe for picking-off. The first big Islamic centre to fall to Christianity was Toledo in 1085.

The Muslims replied with forces from Africa which under the general Yusuf bin Tashfin defeated the Christians resoundingly in 1086, and by 1102 had recaptured most of Andalusia. The general was able to reunite much of Muslim Spain.

Revival

It didn't last. Yusuf died in 1106, and, as one historian puts it, the "rulers of Muslim states began cutting each other's throats again".

Internal rebellions in 1144 and 1145 further shattered Islamic unity, and despite intermittent military successes, Islam's domination of Spain was ended for good.

The Muslims finally lost all power in Spain in 1492. By 1502 the Christian rulers issued an order requiring all Muslims to convert to Christianity, and when this didn't work, they imposed brutal restrictions on the remaining Spanish Muslims.


Watch the video: Nettie (January 2022).